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Wildlife Removal Advice - What are the risks of animals chewing on electric wires?

What are the risks of animals chewing on electric wires?

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There are a number of risks when animals chew on wires, but one of the biggest threats is that your electrical items just won’t work. If you have bats in the attic, for example, they can chew through the electrical wires up there. If those wires are chewed, entire sections of your home or building electrical system will then not work, and you will need to call in an electrician to find the problem, diagnose the problem, and then resolve the problem. If you have a colony of bats up there, you will also need to call in professional wildlife removal experts to lend a hand. It is illegal to move or harm bats during their nesting / maternity seasons, and sadly, that’s around about the time that they would set up home in yours.



Annoying, right?

Bats aren’t the only animals that chew, and it won’t just be your attic that is under attack. Rats in the garage have been known to chew through the wires that are attached to power tools, light switch systems, alarm systems, door opening systems, and more. They have even been known to crawl into various engine compartments and working their chewing magic in there too, which, as you can imagine, puts your life in grave danger. Chewed wires in your vehicle will be dangerous. Imagine if they were to chew through the brake cable!

Squirrels are other animals that chew, and mice too, but rats and bats tend to be worst culprits.

As well as costing you a great deal of money, potentially ruining your car, and causing half the electrical items and light switches to NOT work in your building, there are other risks associated with animals chewing on wires. In the attic especially, exposed wires can pose a fire hazard, particularly when it has the potential to come into contact with flammable items, such as attic insulation. Most homeowners will generally have a number of prized possessions in their attic too, and this may include important paperwork, old photographs, and more. We haven't always lived in such a digital age, and that means many of us have lots of paperwork that we lug from one home to another. If that stuff is in your attic, and wild animals are chewing through the electric cables and wires up there, there is a good chance it could all go up in flames.

We would suggest making sure that you inspect your home on a regular basis. By doing this, you can identify places in your home or around your building that needs special care and attention. Broken siding or eaves, for example, or perhaps drains that aren’t covered, air conditioning vents that aren’t sealed properly, or maybe even damaged roof tiles, or holes in the roof. If you know what areas of your home could fall under attack from these wild critters, you can take steps to prevent it from happening, and prevention is the best defense when you're up against animals like these. Rats are tiny creatures, although bigger than you’d think usually, and they only require the smallest of holes to gain access into a property. These holes are easily missed, especially when you don't know what you're looking for. By hiring a wildlife removal expert to come out to your home, you can work together to protect your home from animal invasions, and gain knowledge about something that you should already know about. If you are a homeowner, protecting your home from invaders is essential, and your responsibility. Some homeowners insurance politicos even dictate as such …

For more information, you may want to click on one of these guides that I wrote:
How To Guide: Who should I hire? - What questions to ask, to look for, who NOT to hire.
How To Guide: do it yourself! - Advice on saving money by doing wildlife removal yourself.
Guide: How much does wildlife removal cost? - Analysis of wildlife control prices.
animals in the attic
noises in the attic

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